21 Aug

Here is our interview with Catherine Parayre of The Small Walker Press about our book Videopoetry / Vidéopoésie. Enjoy!

1 :07 min
Why this book?

2:33 min
Many of your works are collaborative, how do you work together on projects?

8:40 min
Your book is called Videopoetry / Vidéopoésie. Many people talk about film poems or cine poetry, what guides your choice of words?

11:44 min
How does a printed text do justice to time-based material?

15:55 min
In your practice of videopoetry, in what ways is the writing of poetry inspired or directed by the video component? What is the creative-writing process?

17: 45 min
How would you say that the end product, the published book with still images, is changing or not your videopoetry work?

20:04 min
A question about the movement in the images + conclusion

11 Aug

Videopoetry / Videopoésie by Daniel H. Dugas and Valerie LeBlanc has been launched through the Small Walker Press, Centre for Studies in Arts and Culture, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON. Here are some still images from our recent conversation with Dr. Catherine Parayre, Editor at The Small Walker Press. The interview will be released next week!

The online version of the book can be downloaded for free at the following address: https://dr.library.brocku.ca/handle/10464/14790

The book is also available in paper version. Purchase inquiries: basicbrugel@gmail.com

We would like to thank the Canada Council for the Arts for assistance through an Explore and Create Grant. Due to COVID 19 restrictions, we are presenting the interview in lieu of an onsite launch at Brock University.

8 Jul

We are pleased that our installation Around Osprey has been included in the Electronic Literature Organization Conference and Festival 2020.

About the exhibition

(un)continuity is an invitation to explore fluidity, to break binaries, and challenge categories: works in this exhibition explore representation and presentation; play along spectra of light, sound, and probe the visible-invisible; and embrace unity and discord. This type of boundary work is at the heart of electronic literature, a practice of exploring the limits of born-digital storytelling that includes multimodal writing, digital art, playful narrative, interactive fiction, literary games, hypertext, and screen fiction.

This exhibition is part of the Electronic Literature Organization Conference and Festival 2020, hosted by the University of Central Florida and occurring online starting July 16th. Curated by Shannon Lindsay, Ha’ani Hogan, and Anastasia Salter, the exhibition was originally intended for physical space: however, following the closure of most shared physical space with the advent of global pandemic, the exhibition was re-imagined as a virtual, interactive display. The exhibition includes interactive, procedural, generative, and otherwise experimental works by artists from around the world.

Originally, this work was planned as two separate installations for the UCF Art Gallery and Orlando CityArts. These spaces are still adapting, as COVID-19 numbers continue to rise in the state of Florida. Some works are captured only through documentation as a result: others have been fully reimagined, and represent new work created in response to the current moment. As we imagine how gallery spaces persist even as public buildings remain closed to crowds, the curators hope this exhibition will provide inspiration and connection.

Curated by Shannon Lindsay, Ha’ani Hogan, and Anastasia Salter


Around Osprey is a two-screen projection based on our artist residency with the Conservation Foundation of the Gulf Coast in Osprey, FL, 2018. We created the two video programs: Element A and Element B.

For this virtual exhibition, the two video programs have the same duration of 29 min 38 sec, simulating the interactive element of the original design. The suggested viewing setup is: two laptops placed side-by-side; Element A on the left, Element B on the right. The two programs should be started simultaneously.

Element A is a series of 12 poetic videos and relates to explorations. The moving pictures and sound treatments for these were gathered from our notes, poetry and stories, research outings, and meetings with local residents. The overall flow of the work relates to encounters with the natural world, environmental concerns over development and human encroachment into natural settings, and what derives from those human interventions.

Element B – Our explorations of coastal areas were overshadowed by the omnipresence and effects of the Red Tide, aka K. brevis. As it altered the environment, it also shaped our perceptions. As the cell count of these organisms grew, fish and other oxygen-starved sea animals washed up on beaches. We humans also choked for air. To bring forward observations about the far-reaching effects of the Red Tide, we created Element B (no sound), a real-time reading of a data sets for K. Brevis weekly cell counts. (For this virtual exhibition the real-time has been replaced with a video capture.) Element B can be seen as a disrupted state of the environment. The data was entered by day and location on 16 South Florida beaches over a twelve-month timespan. When the counts are low, there is little-to-no change in the moving pictures. When the counts are higher, the images take on corresponding degrees of red tint and temporal shifts that show up as blurriness. The cell count data and location are not directly related to the images they are placed upon, instead, the flow of effects on images relates to how nature works, in cycles, always little by little, and sometimes, surprisingly fast, with overwhelming effects. The text information, on the bottom left of Element B is as follows: K. brevis cell count | Date | Location.

To aid the visualization of the K. brevis data, we are including the information below:

Possible effect of K. brevis

Not present – Levels of 1 cell or less: No effects anticipated
Very Low – Levels > 1 – 10 cells/ml: Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures
Low – Levels > 10 – 100 cells/ml: Respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures; possible fish kills
Medium – Levels > 100 – 1,000 cells/ml: Respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures; possible fish
kills; detection of chlorophyll by satellites at upper range of cell abundance
High – Levels > 1,000 cells/ml: As above plus water discoloration

23 Apr

Videopoetry = Vidéopoésie
BY  · PUBLISHED  · UPDATED 

Wonderful news that the mammoth – over 400 pages – publication Videopoetry = Vidéopoésie by leading Canadian videopoets Valerie LeBlanc and Daniel H. Dugas is now out online https://dr.library.brocku.ca/handle/10464/14790 

Published by Brock University’s Small Walker Press it is a comprehensive survey of their collaboration over a thirty-year period. Catherine Parayre has written the French introduction, with Lucy English writing in English. It has also been my pleasure to contribute an essay on their extraordinary body of work. In my research it took me a long time to get to know (and relish) all their developments. I am particularly fond of their use of documenting first-hand experience as in ‘Slices of Life’ from the nineties for example; as well as their finely crafted and important ecopoetry films of more recent years. For my in-depth analysis on their filmic and poetic techniques please check out the book itself.

But I would just like to say that what adds to the poetry (that is always succinct, and of its time and place whilst setting us on a philosophical path), is the fact that it is bilingual. This can create comparisons (visual as well as verbal), as one language is typeset next to the other, but also reminds us of their Canadian roots, and all its associations and influences (geographic, artistic and political). The poetry and the videos emanate not just from the combining of two creative fields, and the collaboration and consequent creative marriage of two people, but two significant cultures. This ‘bilinguality’ extends our understanding of what it means to be not just poetically engaged and enlightened but politically aware in the 21st century. Go Read!!!!

21 Apr

Videopoetry = Vidéopoésie
by Sarah Tremlett, published april 21, 2020 – updated april 23, 2020

Wonderful news that the mammoth – over 400 pages – publication Videopoetry = Vidéopoésie by leading Canadian videopoets Valerie LeBlanc and Daniel H. Dugas is now out online https://dr.library.brocku.ca/handle/10464/14790

Published by Brock University’s Small Walker Press it is a comprehensive survey of their collaboration over a thirty-year period. Catherine Parayre has written the French introduction, with Lucy English writing in English. It has also been my pleasure to contribute an essay on their extraordinary body of work. In my research it took me a long time to get to know (and relish) all their developments. I am particularly fond of their use of documenting first-hand experience as in ‘Slices of Life’ from the nineties for example; as well as their finely crafted and important ecopoetry films of more recent years. For my in-depth analysis on their filmic and poetic techniques please check out the book itself.

But I would just like to say that what adds to the poetry (that is always succinct, and of its time and place whilst setting us on a philosophical path), is the fact that it is bilingual. This can create comparisons (visual as well as verbal), as one language is typeset next to the other, but also reminds us of their Canadian roots, and all its associations and influences (geographic, artistic and political). The poetry and the videos emanate not just from the combining of two creative fields, and the collaboration and consequent creative marriage of two people, but two significant cultures. This ‘bilinguality’ extends our understanding of what it means to be not just poetically engaged and enlightened but politically aware in the 21st century. Go Read!!!!

 

http://liberatedwords.com/2020/04/21/videopoetry-videopoesie/

About Valerie LeBlanc


Originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, pluri-­disciplinary artist and writer Valerie LeBlanc has worked in Canada, the United States, Europe, and Australia. Her creations travel between poetry, performance, visual and written theory. Valerie LeBlanc has been creating video poetry since the mid 1980’s, and is the creator of the MediaPackBoard (MPB), portable screening / performance device.

L’artiste pluridisciplinaire Valerie LeBlanc est vidéaste, poète, performeuse et essayiste. Son travail oscille entre le remarquable et le quotidien. Elle a exposé ses œuvres en Europe, en Australie et au Brésil. Elle crée des vidéopoèmes depuis le milieu des années 1980 et a inventé le MediaPackBoard (MPB), un appareil de projection mobile pour la performance.

Date : April 2020
Genre : Vidéopoésie/Videopoetry
Français/English

Videopoetry / Vidéopoésie

Small Walker Press

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